CN Rail Locomotive – In Action

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CN Rail locomotive 2004
Picture Taken By John Radnor – Copywriter 2004, picture was taken while in operation just exiting the local rail yard

CN is the largest railway in Canada, in terms of both revenue and the physical size of its rail network, and is currently Canada’s only transcontinental railway company, spanning Canada from the Atlantic coast in Nova Scotia to the Pacific coast in British Columbia. Its range once reached across the island of Newfoundland until 1988, when the Newfoundland Railway was abandoned.

Locomotives do not have traditional CN teardrop windshields.
Equipped with remote-radio equipment and ditchlight-mounted
marker lights

Railways, until the rise of the personal automobile and creation of taxpayer-funded all-weather highways, were the only viable long-distance land transportation available in Canada for many years. Many countries regard railway networks as critical infrastructure (even to this day) and at the time of the creation of CNR during the continuing threat of the First World War, Canada was not the only country to engage in railway nationalization.

The Canadian National Railways (CNR) was incorporated on June 6, 1919, comprising several railways that had become bankrupt and fallen into federal government hands, along with some railways already owned by the government. Now primarily a freight railway, CN also operated passenger services until 1978, when they were assumed by Via Rail. The only passenger services run by CN after 1978 were several mixed trains (freight and passenger) in Newfoundland, and a several commuter trains both on CN’s electrified routes and towards the South Shore in the Montreal area (the latter lasted without any public subsidy until 1986).